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Driving on Karioitahi and Muriwai beaches

Getting a permit for Muriwai and Kariotahi beaches is easy.

Published: 12 July 2018

Driving on beaches in Auckland is not allowed unless you have a permit. The only exception is to launch or retrieve a boat or emergency situations.

However, Aucklanders can apply for a permit from Auckland Council.

Getting a permit for two beaches – Muriwai and Kariotahi – is easy. It’s free and only takes about five minutes, and it can all be done online.

Always follow the law

Beaches are legal roads, so all road rules apply. This means drivers need to:

  • stick to the speed limits
  • hold a current driver licence
  • ensure their vehicle has registration and warrant of fitness
  • not exceed legal drink drive limits
  • ensure they and their passengers are wearing seatbelts
  • wear helmets when necessary
  • show appropriate driving behaviour.

Guidelines for driving on Muriwai and Karioitahi beaches

  • Take safety equipment, including a spade and a rope.
  • Always drive with headlights on.
  • Stick to the hard part of the beach below the high tide line. Check tide times before you go out.
  • Access to the beach is limited to three hours either side of low tide.
  • Look out for partially submerged objects.
  • Stay off the dunes - fragile dune systems are damaged by vehicle use.
  • Always slow down when there are people or animals around.
  • Be aware of shorebirds nesting at high tide.
  • You must always have your beach driving permit when you are driving on the beach - having it on your mobile phone or device is fine.

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