Elsewhere and Nowhere Else

Where

Te Tuhi, 13 Reeves Road, Pakuranga, Auckland

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When

Wednesday 6 July 2022
Thursday 7 July 2022
Friday 8 July 2022
Saturday 9 July 2022
Sunday 10 July 2022
Monday 11 July 2022
Tuesday 12 July 2022
Wednesday 13 July 2022
Thursday 14 July 2022
Friday 15 July 2022
Saturday 16 July 2022
Sunday 17 July 2022
Monday 18 July 2022
Tuesday 19 July 2022
Wednesday 20 July 2022
Thursday 21 July 2022
Friday 22 July 2022
Saturday 23 July 2022
Sunday 24 July 2022
Monday 25 July 2022
Tuesday 26 July 2022
Wednesday 27 July 2022
Thursday 28 July 2022
Friday 29 July 2022
Saturday 30 July 2022
Sunday 31 July 2022
Monday 1 August 2022
Tuesday 2 August 2022
Wednesday 3 August 2022
Thursday 4 August 2022
Friday 5 August 2022
Saturday 6 August 2022
Sunday 7 August 2022
Monday 8 August 2022
Tuesday 9 August 2022
Wednesday 10 August 2022
Thursday 11 August 2022
Friday 12 August 2022
Saturday 13 August 2022
Sunday 14 August 2022
Monday 15 August 2022
Tuesday 16 August 2022
Wednesday 17 August 2022
Thursday 18 August 2022
Friday 19 August 2022
Saturday 20 August 2022
Sunday 21 August 2022
Monday 22 August 2022
Tuesday 23 August 2022
Wednesday 24 August 2022
Thursday 25 August 2022
Friday 26 August 2022
Saturday 27 August 2022
Sunday 28 August 2022
Monday 29 August 2022
Tuesday 30 August 2022
Wednesday 31 August 2022
Thursday 1 September 2022
Friday 2 September 2022
Saturday 3 September 2022
Sunday 4 September 2022
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9am-5pm


Cost

Free
Elsewhere and nowhere else
Li-Ming Hu, Boney (Phoney?) M, 2020 (still). Image courtesy of the artist.

Within the "Book of the Beginning" of the 4th-century epic known as the Mahabharata, there is a captivating and peculiar aphorism: "What is here is elsewhere. What is not here is nowhere else."

Scholars have interpreted this expression as a rumination on the contradictions inherent in the singularity and multiplicity of human existence.

Despite the differences in our cultural locales, political contexts and environments, there are of course aspects of the human experience we can connect to regardless of our personal subjectivities.

This exhibition features artwork by Kah Bee Chow, Li-Ming Hu and Yuk King Tan, three artists who are umbilically connected to Aotearoa but for different reasons live elsewhere.

Through them, we are reminded of how multifarious our connections to the world are.

In this moment of opening back up to the world, this exhibition seeks to agitate notions that separate the local from the international through the lens of artists that occupy both spheres.

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