The House is Full

Where

Te Tuhi, 13 Reeves Road, Pakuranga, Auckland

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When

Wednesday 6 July 2022
Thursday 7 July 2022
Friday 8 July 2022
Saturday 9 July 2022
Sunday 10 July 2022
Monday 11 July 2022
Tuesday 12 July 2022
Wednesday 13 July 2022
Thursday 14 July 2022
Friday 15 July 2022
Saturday 16 July 2022
Sunday 17 July 2022
Monday 18 July 2022
Tuesday 19 July 2022
Wednesday 20 July 2022
Thursday 21 July 2022
Friday 22 July 2022
Saturday 23 July 2022
Sunday 24 July 2022
Monday 25 July 2022
Tuesday 26 July 2022
Wednesday 27 July 2022
Thursday 28 July 2022
Friday 29 July 2022
Saturday 30 July 2022
Sunday 31 July 2022
Monday 1 August 2022
Tuesday 2 August 2022
Wednesday 3 August 2022
Thursday 4 August 2022
Friday 5 August 2022
Saturday 6 August 2022
Sunday 7 August 2022
Monday 8 August 2022
Tuesday 9 August 2022
Wednesday 10 August 2022
Thursday 11 August 2022
Friday 12 August 2022
Saturday 13 August 2022
Sunday 14 August 2022
Monday 15 August 2022
Tuesday 16 August 2022
Wednesday 17 August 2022
Thursday 18 August 2022
Friday 19 August 2022
Saturday 20 August 2022
Sunday 21 August 2022
Monday 22 August 2022
Tuesday 23 August 2022
Wednesday 24 August 2022
Thursday 25 August 2022
Friday 26 August 2022
Saturday 27 August 2022
Sunday 28 August 2022
Monday 29 August 2022
Tuesday 30 August 2022
Wednesday 31 August 2022
Thursday 1 September 2022
Friday 2 September 2022
Saturday 3 September 2022
Sunday 4 September 2022
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9am-5pm


Cost

Free
The house is full
Parbhu Makan, Chandu’s Wellington, Parbhu mama’s place 70’s. Image courtesy of the artist.

The house is full is an exhibition that considers artistic practices on the fringes of anti-establishment art movements in Aotearoa from the 1970s onwards. 

The 1970s was a historically heightened time of cultural rigidity in Aotearoa. It was marked by many Māori land protests, the Dawn Raids and the changes to country’s immigration policies, which made it difficult for people from specific cultural groups to move to Aotearoa if they seemed unlikely to assimilate into New Zealand culture, which at the time was widely considered to be part of a broader British identity. 

Various figures in Aotearoa’s art scene rejected these anglocentric structures of power, including the values of the traditional art establishment, making way for more experimental artistic practices.

The house is full showcases four artists whose contributions to these art movements within this period of cultural transformation are deserving of more attention: Emily Karaka, Parbhu Makan, John Miller and Teuane Tibbo, whose visions of home were not of Britain, but of a home in Aotearoa and elsewhere.

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