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Community says no to liquor store opening

Published: 3 December 2018
Harry Doig, Puketāpapa Local Board Chair

Mt Roskill residents have welcomed the decision that another liquor store will not be opened at Three Kings.

Residents and community organisations had objected to the application to open the store, and Puketāpapa Local Board has supported and applauded the community’s efforts.

“The application received a number of objection letters and as a result, the applicant withdrew their application," said Harry Doig, Chair, Puketāpapa Local Board.

"To the locals, this is a great example of community empowerment and curbing the harmful effects of the easy availability of alcohol in the neighbourhood.” 

Puketāpapa Local Board was among at least 33 local objectors to the proposal for a new large-format Super Liquor store at 509 Mt Albert Rd, Three Kings. Other objectors included local schools and churches, as well as businesses and residents in the area. 

One of the key issues to the objections was adding another bottle store in an area that already had a high number – a density of at least 15 within 2km of the proposed site, with two existing off-licences within two minutes’ walk of where the new one would have been. 

Objectors, including the local board, were also concerned about the high number of sensitive sites located close to the site, including primary, intermediate and secondary schools, parks with 24-hour liquor bans, a retirement village and boarding house, as well as the Mt Roskill Library and significant areas of state housing.

Alcohol Healthwatch produced a research report on alcohol harm in Three Kings, which the local board added to its submission. The report found that the Three Kings area is in the top ten territorial authorities and local boards in New Zealand for male hospital admissions wholly attributable to alcohol, and is also in the top 6-8% of all areas for housing deprivation and crime, which can be exacerbated by a high density of off-licences in an area. 

The local community worked hard to show their opposition, through petitions, door-knocking, leaflets, and two well-attended public meetings, and had just set up a community committee to continue campaigning against the new bottle store when the applicant withdrew.